PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds’ Steam review score plummets over Chinese VPN issues

PlayerUnknowns Battlegrounds April Sales Charts

Despite seeing enormous success and unprecedented concurrent player-counts in recent months, it’s not all sunshine and lollipops for Battle Royale shooter PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds. Over the past few days, Battlegrounds’ Steam review score has dropped significantly, seemingly due to the inclusion of in-game ads for a VPN service in the Chinese version of the game.

Once the server woes have blown over, check out our guide to the game to give yourself an edge.

Despite the game being available internationally and fully localised for a Chinese audience, this large section of the audience seems short-tempered and underserved, with official Chinese servers either nonexistent or poorly maintained, as in order to enjoy the game, many Chinese players have had to connect to the North American or EU servers.

There are plenty of Steam reviews from the other side of the fence complaining about laggy Chinese players warping around the environment, making them especially hard and unpredictable targets. This situation seems bad enough to begin with, but tempers flared yesterday, with Chinese players claiming to have have seen in-game ads advertising an 'accelerator' VPN service intended to provide smoother connections to international servers.

PUBG Review Bomb

Thanks to Steam’s new review history chart feature, we can see the exact time and scale of the outrage, with almost 10,000 negative reviews posted in the past day, dwarfing the ~3,600 positive scores. Not every negative review is coming from the Chinese players however - it seems that there are a great many complaints of players being banned over allegations of stream sniping (abusing your knowledge of a Twitch streamer’s location - Goldeneye screen-watching for the modern age), although many affected are claiming innocence.

Are you a Chinese Battlegrounds player, angered by the promotion of this VPN service in-game? Have you bumped into Chinese players on the North American servers and found their connections problematic for gameplay? Are you a Streamer who has found themselves sniped, or a player banned for this offense, whether committed or not? Share your thoughts in the comments below.

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CursedNaruto avatarkdjac avatarRasenka avatargfw2012 avatarLord Gorzul avatarTsunamiWombat avatar+1
kdjac Avatar
5
kdjac(9 days 18 hours played)
3 Months ago

China number 1!!

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CursedNaruto Avatar
21
3 Months ago

If stream sniping is a real thing it's the idiot streamer fault for 1 being an idiot and 2 disclosuring their location

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Rasenka Avatar
53
3 Months ago

This is nonsense.. if I deliberately go out of my way to harass someone I deserve to be punished, end of story. It's really not that hard, but I still enjoy the tears and whining of the snipers though.

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Lord Gorzul Avatar
5
Lord Gorzul(8 days 2 hours played)
3 Months ago

That is a naive outlook, in general.

I would punish the streamer if anything for whining.

They can set a 30s delay to their stream and solve the issue. It's as simple as that.

If you're going to go out yelling you have a million dollars in your pocket, you're deservedly going to get mugged sooner or later, that's on you.

-1
QDP2 Avatar
898
QDP2(1 day 6 hours played)
3 Months ago

Most streamers already delay their streams. The problem isn't from location output, but from others going out of their way to mark them for non-snipers.

Snipers watch streamers to see when they're close to ending/queuing for the next game, to then spam in and out of lobbies, hunting for the lobby the streamer(s) are in. Once they get into a lobby with a streamer, snipers vary in type (generally based on player count/skill level). Some go hunting for the streamer based on their direction/location, trying to guess where they're going and take them out. Others will just watch and drive around where they think the streamer is to draw other players and cause more trouble for the streamer. Either way, when thinking from the snipers perspective their goal is to annoy the streamer, and find satisfaction through others pain.

If people really enjoy this type of satisfaction, all they have to do is get into a competitive game, be it something like EVE (where the games market is built on bullying and backstabbing) or a MOBA/Shooter (where getting good allows tilting/breaking the enemy team). It's not like these kind of players are lacking a medium to enjoy themselves. Instead they're being lazy; harassing streamers to reach a point of bullying faster than they could by improving their skill. Is there really any reason to defend this kind of player? You'd rather protect the person who goes out of there way to find advantages in games? They are the screen-cheaters of last era, and only 1 step away from being hackers in current games.

Probably best to wrap this up by returning to your flawed analogy. The main difference between a mugging and stream-sniping is that the sniper walks away with nothing. There's no cash-incentive; no in-game reward; no tangible benefit to them. Only a smile on their face from annoying others. Your stance seems to back the mugger this scenario, like his theft is acceptable because of the rich persons naivety. Just the same as a thieves, stream snipers should get punished.

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TsunamiWombat Avatar
664
TsunamiWombat replied to QDP2
3 Months ago

Others "Pain". It's a videogame, mate.

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QDP2 Avatar
898
QDP2(1 day 6 hours played) replied to QDP2
3 Months ago

@TsunamiWombat you're right, pain is a bit of a strong word here. But bullying and harassment are plenty suitable substitutes; both of which shouldn't be accepted, never mind approved/defended as they are today.

EDIT: That said, emotional pain is every bit as real as physical pain. Depression (thanks to other people's outlook on it) results in far too many people breaking. To focus on streamers, many of them have built their career on public acceptance. To destroy their confidence is just as bad (morally speaking) as trying to get a work colleague fired. Sure, they live off social media so they know they have to weather out more than average, but that isn't justification for the harassment. Only an excuse for it to continue.

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Rasenka Avatar
53
3 Months ago

How much money they have isn't relevant. If someone goes out of his way to purposefully harass someone else he is first and foremost a dick, or a full fledged p.o.s.

And they deserve every punishment the devs are able to dish out. Don't wanna get banned? Play the game like you were a decent human being.

Pretty "naive outlook", I know.

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Lord Gorzul Avatar
5
Lord Gorzul(8 days 2 hours played) replied to Rasenka
3 Months ago

Well That's life and reality, we aren't living in a utopia.

There's always going to a be small percentage of dicks. You can ban 100 , there will be 100 more. It's not a solution.

And it isnt easy to prove either. Quite often innocents get banned, which is the real problem here.

Would be much more sound to either accept the fact that some people are dicks, or not tempt them.

Again, if you go down to harlem yelling the N word and get beat up by a gang, I'd say it's your fault as much as theirs.

I dont feel bad for the streamers in the least bit, they are making things unnecessarily complicated.

CSGO matches are delayed for that very reason, and nobody is nagging.

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gfw2012 Avatar
1
3 Months ago

Most of VPN are dead in China, you can not discuss Proxy or VPN.

That PlayerUnknown’s partner has government background.

Search XunYouKeJi 300467.SZ

A VPN service company has 8 billion CNY stock market value, hahaha.

Their product was removed from Steam in a few days, Steam app id is 496840.

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