New Windows 10 anti-bloatware update attempts to block installation of Win32 apps

Win32 Bloatware

In the upcoming ‘Creators’ update for Windows 10, Microsoft are planning to add a new feature which attempts to block the installation of bloatware on a person’s computer. This new feature has Windows 10 throwing up a user warning whenever someone tries to install an app not bought via the Windows Store.

If you're looking to speed up your rig, check out our overclocking guide.

This sounds innocuous enough—Microsoft are just trying to protect Windows 10 users—but the problem arises from the message this warning box presents whenever someone tries to install a Win32 program for example. This warning has been added under the guise of keeping the PC “safe and reliable”, framing non-Windows Store apps as somehow dangerous.

The added problem with this feature as it interferes with many perfectly safe programs which use Win32, like Google Chrome, Steam, Photoshop and even older versions of Microsoft Word. While useful for new computer users who have a propensity to install anything that looks interesting, including malware, it’s disconcerting to see Microsoft treat non-Windows programs as inherently threatening to a user.

At the moment, this feature is disabled by default, with users being able to swap between just having the warning box appear or outright banning the installation of Win32 programs. Microsoft is working on a new Windows 10 SKU as part of their push for the Universal Windows Platform, which apparently has this feature enabled as standard. For anyone who uses any other service besides the Windows Store to play their games, or just uses general Win32 programs, this update sounds like an absolute nightmare if the option is hidden deep within submenus.

The ‘Creators’ update which includes this feature is set to launch sometime in April, so time will tell if this feature is kept on as standard. I’m sure other developers will not take kindly to this feature, especially as it treats their safe programs as potential malware or bloatware.

Thanks, MSPowerUser.

War Thunder
Sign in to Commentlogin to comment
LordCrash avatarBelimawr avatarLevy avatarRock1m1 avatarV.PUPKIN avatarAnakhoresis avatar+3
LordCrash Avatar
141
4 Months ago

A warning pop-up when installing Win32 programs results in an "absolute nightmare" for users???

Wow, relax. It's just a pop-up that disappears with a simple click of a button, nothing that justifies a rant.

And to be honest, UWP apps ARE much safer than Win32 apps since they don't have access to vital functions in the Windows kernel. That's just a fact. That being said, I think there should (and must) be a security option that allows experienced users to disable that checkbox at their own risk. That's about it, not a big issue after all.

3
Rock1m1 Avatar
331
4 Months ago

I like how UWP apps don't leave a trail of files and registries behind all over the system. UWP apps keep them contained in 1 folder.

2
Anakhoresis Avatar
510
4 Months ago

On that note, why the heck was it so difficult for developers to understand that the "My Games" folder was for game information and saves? So frustrating how that was implemented and yet developers still kept putting saves in "My Documents"

3
V.PUPKIN Avatar
1
4 Months ago

But it kinda is.

Because anything unexpected for a user is a nightmare. Maybe not for him, but for someone who will be obligated to help and/or advice him what to do. For support operators. For everyone, hot tech-savy like YOU

1
LordCrash Avatar
141
4 Months ago

Well, in my experience, everyone who doesn't understand what this checkbox means shouldn't install software themselves anyway. That's just how it is. So no, there is no difference for support operators imho. The same people who needed support before will still need support now. Everybody who got along installing stuff themselves won't need any help with this either.

2
Million Bpm Avatar
1
4 Months ago

It's about the slippery slope. Of course one install/don't install dialog box is a non-issue but that's not the point. The point is what this dialog box will transform into a year from now. Or two. Or five.

1
Anakhoresis Avatar
510
3 Months ago

Well Windows Vista came out 10 years ago so your answer is... Not much.

Also, "Slippery slope" is a logical fallacy.

1
nu1mlock Avatar
679
4 Months ago

People seem to forget that this isn't much different from the current situation where you get a message saying that a downloaded program could be dangerous, and asks if you are sure that you want to start it.

I honestly don't see what the big deal is when they've pretty much just redesigned a pop-up that is already there.

2
Anakhoresis Avatar
510
4 Months ago

People have become so used to how it is now they're scared of/bothered by essentially the same thing with a new name.

The problem is that tech-oriented websites forget that we are the minority, and the majority of people search for an application or something on google, click the first link, click the first big "DOWNLOAD" button, and then tell their computer to install it.

1
Belimawr Avatar
1177
4 Months ago

windows 10 (and vista, 7 and 8) throws up warnings every time you change a setting or install something, quick we better all run for the hills because windows is controlling us.......

oh wait you can turn that feature off as it is only there to protect inexperienced users, likely the same as this.

1
Levy Avatar
5
4 Months ago

Microsoft definitely went about this the wrong way. They should already know people are mad about their constant shilling of their appstore. They should have taken a page from Apple's book and kept track of where the install file came from. Something like "this file is from an unknown developer and was downloaded from Firefox, are you sure you wish to install?" You would get the same result they were going with here, a warning for users that the install might not be trusted.

1
nu1mlock Avatar
679
4 Months ago

What you are saying is how it currently is.

2
Belimawr Avatar
1177
4 Months ago

it's just trying to protect the uneducated, if they can stop a few unneeded support calls it will be a win for them.

like all their user protection controls that already exist this one can also likely be disabled by an experienced user.

1
pianojo Avatar
1
4 Months ago

I think I hear Linux calling my name...

1