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DuoBlaze commented on
3 Days ago
Microsoft quietly snuck a new anti-cheat system into the Windows 10 Fall Creators UpdateMicrosoft quietly snuck a new anti-cheat system into the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update
DuoBlaze Avatar
Microsoft can do things with their anti-cheat software that no other company can due to operating systems restrictions it can bypass. That’s cool, but doesn’t negate the fact that Microsoft has done some terribly shady stuff to get people to use their unpopular storefront. Examples include: restricting Xbox one directional rumble trigger feature to window store versions of games, restricting capabilities of certain high end video and audio of streaming video services to windows store apps, forcing stock apps to update with additional ad features when they have no online functionality and an update should never have been necessary. Terrible Microsoft. The anti cheat capabilities even if good for gamers, is also bad for gamers as it has the potential to protect attack vectors that other anti-cheat engines cannot due to a Microsoft not permitting the required OS level access.
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Ben Barrett Avatar
Ben Barrett responded to DuoBlaze's comment in
4 Days ago
Hearthstone hero promotion backfires, leads to dozens of fake eventsHearthstone hero promotion backfires, leads to dozens of fake events
DuoBlaze Avatar
Develop an online card game and intentionally leave out means of communicating with other players. Then expect the socially inept introverts you created to congregate at real events with people they have nothing in common with besides a card game?

It blows my mind how completely out of touch Blizzard is with their customers and want they want. It's apparent they have no clue in all their games as the community aspect of all of them is terrible because of blizzard's choices.Reply
Ben Barrett Avatar

They have consistently some of the strongest communities in the world, lol.

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DuoBlaze commented on
5 Days ago
The UK government have responded to questions about in-game gamblingThe UK government have responded to questions about in-game gambling
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The question of whether it's gambling is irrelevant. All these games could easily switch to stores with customer choice of micro transactions.

The focus should be on eliminating in-game purchases of any kind. Costs for games should be exactly like any other software or service.
Any combination of initial product fee, subscription or maintenance fees, and/or one time cost for major upgrades.
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DuoBlaze commented on
1 Week ago
Battlefield 1 adds Operations server browser in latest updateBattlefield 1 adds Operations server browser in latest update
DuoBlaze Avatar
After a year of failing to fix operations matchmaking repeatedly dropping players into empty matches the devs finally give up and go with the solution all customers asked for on day 1.

Game developers need to start acting like software developers and actually listen to customers and modify their product as requested.
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DuoBlaze commented on
3 Weeks ago
Hawken is shutting down next year, but only on PCHawken is shutting down next year, but only on PC
DuoBlaze Avatar
Say goodbye to all your micro transactions. Perhaps you should try Mech Warrior: Microtransactions Edition.
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{DFT}[3]Wikster Avatar
{DFT}[3]Wikster responded to DuoBlaze's comment in
3 Weeks ago
Nvidia GTX 1070 Ti release date, specs, and performanceNvidia GTX 1070 Ti release date, specs, and performance
DuoBlaze Avatar
Nvidia should just release freesync support and put AMD graphics out of business.Reply
{DFT}[3]Wikster Avatar

Haha, oh man that would be brutal. And while I would love if Nvidia would stop upcharging $100+ per monitor with G-Sync support and just embrace FreeSync; if AMD went out of the graphics business, with the amount of stock I hold in them from back when it was $8.50, I'd cry, lol.

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DuoBlaze Avatar
DuoBlaze commented on
3 Weeks ago
Online toxicity is why the industry is so secretive, say developersOnline toxicity is why the industry is so secretive, say developers
DuoBlaze Avatar
If developers would stop making changes that reduce the quality of their products to increase profits then there would be less "toxicity" as they claim. If he thinks game customers are toxic then he should spend a few years in business software development. Some of the crap Ubisoft and their developers have done would mean a rapid loss of customers in other software industries. Game devs make their money in initial sales while having no SLAs nor customer mandated requirements to adhere to. Game developers have it easy. Zero sympathy.
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Shadowized Avatar
Shadowized responded to DuoBlaze's comment in
1 Month ago
"I don't care how many asses I have to spank." Fake Jeff Kaplan is tired of toxicity"I don't care how many asses I have to spank." Fake Jeff Kaplan is tired of toxicity
DuoBlaze Avatar
People have always been toxic in online games, particularly since the introduction of matchmaking solutions. The focus needs to be on designing games to engender fun competition and not foster animosity or a sense that you have to do what others say. I feel matchmaking does the latter, especially in PvP games.

Prior to matchmaking all online games had close-knit communities, whether they were counter-strike or unreal servers on a favorites list, an MMO server, or DOTA custom games titles in Warcraft 3, etc.

Toxicity existed but was remediated quickly by the community or admins. REAL admins or game masters or customer service. Back in the Everquest days GMs would deal with it within an hour.

Nowadays it's an automated punishment system, or punishment carried out by someone or a group of people who were not even involved in the game. With the need for customer retention especially for micro transactions we have developers more reluctant than ever to discipline players.

But I feel the most fundamental issue is that matchmaking results in a lack of community feel. Different players every match, every game, even in MMO games.

I have no idea what the solution to this is now that matchmaking is a fundamental need. All I know is that online PC and console gaming toxicity was not even 10% as bad as it is now 15 years ago.Reply
Shadowized Avatar

as somebody who has run CS servers for over a decade I agree that admins are the solution to many of the gripes in todays games, and it allowed communities to pick how they wanted to be run and what they would and wouldn't tolerate, when games like Battlefield 2 came out and prevented you from hosting your own ranked servers without going through their insanely overpriced providers, it became quite clear that the game developers wanted more control over how the communities operated as well.


with that came the transition to centralized servers and automated matchmaking/punishment systems which I feel is one of the reasons so many have become "toxic", a term I've grown to hate because it blames players for the faults of the system.


I think that matchmaking in general has really failed as a concept and its one of the reasons I gave up on games like DOTA2, not because I didn't like the game but because the matchmaking has become absolutely horrendous to the point of it being a futile battle to retain your sanity. An example of this is with the somewhat recent changes to matchmaking where Valve psychologists decided to pair up players who have a high behavior score (people who aren't reported frequently) with NEW players.


now I get it, they don't want to scare off potential whales so they try showing them a good time, but by doing this they are creating the exact thing they are trying to prevent, which goes back to my point about futility. and don't even get me start on how they refuse to fix being matched up with players who don't even speak your language...

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Belimawr Avatar
Belimawr responded to DuoBlaze's comment in
1 Month ago
Is Destiny 2 good? After 40 hours, here's what we thinkIs Destiny 2 good? After 40 hours, here's what we think
DuoBlaze Avatar
My issues: P2P network lag (there was moderate rubber banding in the PC beta), only 4v4 PvP which is far too few players (and just screams console limitations harming PC game design), micro transactions in a premium AAA game is distasteful, and the text chat is (at least in beta) only for fireteam members and friends/clan members. I think the text chat limitation is going to seriously upset PC players more-so than the other categories.Reply
Belimawr Avatar

saying it is consoles limiting PC, you have to remember it's a console game, made by developers who made the Halo PC games terrible.

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Dave James Avatar
Dave James responded to DuoBlaze's comment in
1 Month ago
AMD Radeon RX Vega 56 review: even if you could buy one, you probably shouldn’t… yetAMD Radeon RX Vega 56 review: even if you could buy one, you probably shouldn’t… yet
DuoBlaze Avatar
Those total power draw numbers are not at all like what I've observed. I've had a vega 64 liquid card in my PC with all default wattman settings for weeks. During peak (spikes - meaning above average) utilization I still have not exceeded 475w TPD from my entire PC. With my RX480 that never exceeded 400w. Either the that 345w number is wrong or I've got some major headroom for overclocking.

As it goes right now using balanced profile the radiator fan is almost inaudible while gaming, barely beyond the noise level of my chassis fans and runs much cooler than my air cooled RX480 did.

I feel like reviewers are not being accurate with power draw, noise and heat numbers.Reply
Dave James Avatar

I may be wrong here, but I think you might be getting confused between total platform power draw and the rated thermal design point (TDP) of the cards.


The TDP of your liquid-chilled Vega 64 is 345W, essentially meaning its cooling has been designed to dissipate that level of energy use under load.


The total platform power draw shown in the benchmarks above represent the amount of energy being drawn from the wall into our test rig's PSU. That was taken using a discrete energy meter while running Battlefield 4 at max settings and at 1440p; the same method I've used for all of my GPU tests for a good few generations of graphics card.


The temperature readings are taken from Afterburner, which we leave running throughout the entirety of our testing suite to catch the maximum temperature, as well as long term GPU frequencies too.

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