Microsoft promise higher frame rates for Windows 10 in improved Game Mode video

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Update January 25, 2017: Microsoft have released a new video to celebrate their improved Game Mode rolling out to Windows Insiders. 

If you use Windows 10, Microsoft say the new Game Mode will allocate more GPU and CPU power to videogames, resulting in higher, more consistent frame rates.

Hopefully this new feature will make our list of best PC games even better. 

The feature might not work with all games straight away, but it'll be as simple as pulling up the Game Bar and activating it to get a performance boost, Microsoft say. 

Check out the video above. Our Dave reckons we should temper our excitement a bit, however.

Update January 13, 2017: A free performance boost will come to all your games soon, if you're a Windows 10 user, thanks to a new and improved Game Mode.

The new Game Mode will work for Win32 and UWP apps, and will optimise your PC to run games, toning down unnecessary background applications and diverting more of your PCs heft into running the game.

The new functionality will be rolling out to Windows Insiders soon for testing. Microsoft say they will also share details on how it all works.

Elsewhere, the Creators Update will also add integrated Beam streaming to Windows 10. Users will be able to bring up the Game bar and instantly stream on Beam with the tap of a key. 

Original Story December 29, 2016: Microsoft are apparently working on a new Game Mode feature for Windows 10. The update will make games run better by minimising the resources being used running apps and other background programs while a game is running. 

The new feature will focus on freeing up resources to funnel straight into your games, giving them as much of your computer's power as possible while you’re playing them, according to Windows Central

This update is expected to roll out for Windows Insiders soon, as the public version could well be coming in the Creators Update. 

Whether these improvements will work across all platforms - Steam, Origin, Uplay, etc - or be restricted to Windows Store isn’t clear, but with Microsoft releasing games on Steam, such as Quantum Break, I’d bet that the improvements will be compatible with as many clients as possible. 

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BraveToaster avatarmonkeyfritz avatarxNuke avatarBraneman avatarMighty Gaz avatarlancejen avatar
BraveToaster Avatar
326
6 Months ago

Oh boy I remember getting this super cool (useless) program that would do this 10 years ago. I mean back then it mattered more cuz I had 512mb of RAM, not 8gb, but still

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monkeyfritz Avatar
103
6 Months ago

Sounds too good to be true, but windows is a horrible memory hog when it comes to certain games, so color me curious.

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Mighty Gaz Avatar
67
Mighty Gaz(2 hours played)
5 Months ago

No, it's not. This is a far too common misunderstanding of memory allocation works in a modern OS like win 10.

it'll use whats available is the short response.

unused RAM is wasted RAM.

Same goes for video memory. just cause a game uses 4-6 gig does not mean it needs it. it'll intelligently re-assign RAM and VRAM as needed.

nowadays you cannot take the amount of RAM or VRAM that has been used as being a good indicator of what is needed, but that is a good thing.

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monkeyfritz Avatar
103
5 Months ago

I'm not even sure what you thought I meant from a very simple statement, but your replies don't cover what I was referring to at all.

"it'll intelligently re-assign RAM and VRAM as needed."

That is specifically what I am referring to. Windows stores "freed" memory as "standby" memory, in case a program calls it back again. In some cases this speeds up poorly coded memory management. In other cases it makes better use of large ram pools than the program was designed for. Much more important for older software than it is for modern 64 bit programs.

In certain instances, programs and games that use and release memory too frequently, confuses windows. It will dump released memory into standby, even though the program is never going to call it back. Then it refuses to release that standby memory. This leads to a quasi-memory leak issue in certain cases which will fill your free memory completely with standby memory. This is an issue with windows, not the programs, since only windows controls standby memory.

When that happens, and standby memory has filled your ram completely, any further memory access has to go through windows first to release the standby, which slows the computer virtually the same way as full memory, even if you technically have a dozen gig of free ram. It only becomes an issue when completely full.

It's a problem that has existed since win introduced it, and a problem they continue to deny even exists. It was a major problem with superfetch in win 7, the reason most power users disabled it. It's less of an issue in 10, as far as superfetch and prefetch are concerned.

I've used ramap to clear standby cash in these instances across a dozen computers and laptops over the last decade, and shown countless others how to fix an issue that had them convinced they needed more ram. It's all because of windows "smart memory allocation."

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lancejen Avatar
1
4 Months ago

I really hope more people see monkeyfritz's explanation here.

This is like the old pagefile debate where there are always some people who insist that turning off VRAM will decrease performance no matter how much RAM you got.

IN THEORY that might be the case, but IN PRACTICE it is NOT. In practice Windows often UNABLE to determine when to release junk memory and will cause program to use VRAM which horribly degrade system performance.

I still remember 10 years ago when I was still playing WOW, one most common fix for low frame rate I taught my friend was to turn off pagefile - it instantly DOUBLED their frame rate, it's that simple.

In windows 10 I often too get this nonsense 'out of memory' warning due to 'standby' memory not being released when the PC is turned on for extensive period of time, worse, if I ignore it, my system begin to become unstable or even hang. If I have VRAM turned on, the system will not hang, but will certainly slow down due to program now runs on VRAM while the physical RAM is being hogged for no reason.

The problem is very old, and I had less problem when I had 24G RAM in my previous system. But now I ONLY have 16G, and the problem is back to haunt me.

The only solution I've found is like what monkeyfritz said - RAMAP - to flush the standby memory so some programs will work normally.

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xNuke Avatar
433
5 Months ago

Here's to hoping it's not another one of those features you immediately disable in powershell upon installing Windows 10.

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Braneman Avatar
39
5 Months ago

It'll be restricted to the Windows store because Microsoft REALLY wants that to take off, to the point where they would sacrifice anything to get it to take off. Seriously at this point I think they're desperate enough that they would torpedo the Halo franchise just to get people to use it.

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monkeyfritz Avatar
103
5 Months ago

They went so far as to build an entire OS around it (win 8) out of App Store Envy (who wouldn't be envious of a 30% cut across the board for a billion dollar market?), So I would not put it past them.

But even their OWN universal apps are featureless garbage compared to the exe versions. A waste of space and time for a PC user.

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Mighty Gaz Avatar
67
Mighty Gaz(2 hours played)
5 Months ago

I assume you posted this before the update. I'd have thought the same, but seems not.

"The new Game Mode will work for Win32 and UWP apps"

I get the insider builds, I'm gonna test this and if it's bullshit you better believe I'll be back saying that lol

For the record, I'll NEVER pay for a game from the windows store without many significant improvements to the entire thing.

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